Tag: Self-help

Thought of the Week- Triggering

There has be a lot of print, media and discussion, way beyond the point of ad nauseum, dedicated to this recent phenomenon; triggering. It is the rage in academia and education in general and from my perspective doing real damage with micro aggression identification becoming a sport and not the fun kind. It appears that we are not preparing our youth for success in the world nor are we helping society in general. We can and should disagree without a triggering episode. Holding differing thoughts should be encouraged and in fact celebrated. It is time that we took back the narrative and outline what triggering really looks like in the real business world. Below are the Top 10 THINGS that SHOULD TRIGGER

10- You’re are late for an appointment or meeting

9- You not do the work

8- You do not care enough about your career or company

7- You blame others for your lack of performance

6- you approach each day has a slack day

5- You ridicule others that want to advance

4- You think others should pander to you

3- if you think that a different point of view is not normal and causes distress

2- if you believe everyone should get a medal or award merely for participation

1- you do not respect yourself or others.

Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

Think and Grow Rich is written as straightforward as its title, designating it as an easy to understand and comprehensive guide on how to best attain, retain, and maintain your personal finances. What’s more however, is the lessons of rugged individualism, enlightening wisdom, and inspirational motivation that saturate Mr. Napoleon Hill’s pristine prose.

By depicting the experience of more than 500 innovative and fiscally successful individuals, Hill constructs an enthusiastic script that encapsulates an irreproachable entrepreneurial spirit. The foundation of each man’s wealth in this piece is the idea that they all had nothing to start with except for their ambition and their plan. With meticulous attention to detail, the guts to pursue their dream, and the intelligence to recognize the next step before them, these men are each in their own right the flesh embodiment of the American dream.

Dive into this easy to read classic that describes with simplistic effectiveness “what to do” and “how to do it.” Utilize the system of self-objectivity readily contained between the covers to truly understand what steps you should take next in order to secure a future of wealth. By fusing the famed Andrew Carnegie’s formula for success with real-life experiences, Napoleon Hill has effectively authored not only an inspirational book, but also a step-by-step manual to ascend to fiscal stardom.

Think and Get Rich, Des Hague, Financial

Examine Hills’s thirteen steps to success in order to fully understand exactly what composes a winning philosophy. Each step is simplified to the point of clarity, yet elaborated upon just enough so that they each rightfully remain their own distinct entity. By articulating seemingly abstract principles with precise, comprehensive prose, the author has written a book of truly legendary proportions. Although written in 1937, Think and Grow Rich’s lessons remain to this day as relevant as ever.

Hill also explores the necessity of developing a definite purpose, composing a positive mental attitude, and channeling the power of the subconscious mind, especially in regards to overcoming adversity. These moments of self-reflection are beneficial even for those who decide not to apply the lessons contained herein Think and Grow Rich. Merely by opening your mind to objectively reviewing your own philosophies, you are taking a massive step towards refining your attitude and honing your ambition, towards optimizing your skills and thinking ahead.

You should do yourself a true service and thumb through a copy of Think and Grow Rich  by Napoleon Hill. Take advantage of the wisdom that brought success to so many others.

The Magic of Thinking Big by David J. Schwartz

Des Hague, Thinking Big, Motivation

Written by David Schwartz, The Magic of Thinking Big is a motivational self-help book that proposes a carefully designed program that can help you get the most out of your professional and personal endeavors. Schwartz emphasizes that you don’t have to be the smartest, most talented, or the most connected person in order to succeed in life. The key to success according to this book is spelled out in its own title: the magic of thinking big. When you create a habit of thinking big you will automatically motivate yourself to improve in different aspects of your life such as having a better work life, earning more money, creating better, more satisfying relationships, etc.

The Magic of Thinking Big emphasizes four key points that further prove his thesis about thinking big:

“Think positively toward oneself”

The first thing Schwartz explains is that one of the main factors that tend to hold people back is that they think too small. In order to succeed it is important that you think positively towards yourself. He uses a story of a salesman who sells significantly more products than his colleagues and he is in fact not smarter, more educated, or better than them. He simply sells more because he expects himself to sell more.

“See what can be, not just what is”

Schwartz also stresses the importance of visualization. Thinking big is not just about thoughts and ideas. You actually need to train yourself to see not just the present, but the future possibilities that lie ahead.

“Broadcast good news”

Another great point that the book explains is how transmitting good news is a win/win situation, not only for the people surrounding you, but also for yourself. When you broadcast good news, you and the people around you will feel better, lighter, and more motivated to conquer bigger things.

“Make your attitudes your allies”

Lastly, Schwartz makes a valid point about attitude. Similar to point number three, your overall attitude about things will affect your emotions, your productivity, and your overall stamina. Make it a habit to make your attitudes your allies; have these feelings work for you and not against you.  If you maintain a bad attitude about your job, for example, your success will become stagnant.

Aside from these four key points, The Magic of Thinking Big also describes three failure “diseases”: excuse-itis, detail-itis and procrastination. These are very common factors that will not help you succeed and will definitely not allow you to think big. For example, having excuses for everything will not help you grow and succeed, micromanaging will exhaust you and you will lose vision of the big picture, and procrastination prevents you from being productive, hence getting one step closer to success.

All in all, The Magic of Thinking Big is a very useful book that undoubtedly resonates with many of us, as we all have individual goals we would like to achieve in life. It helped me refocus on the big picture vision I have for myself, and I guarantee it can help you too.

The 100$ Start-Up

So often people question why they are doing what they are doing. As people, how can we spend 40+ hours doing something we don’t enjoy? Life is too short, and Chris Guillebeau explains in The 100$ Start-Up how to monetize your passion. However, the difference with this self-help/how-to book is in the specifics. Whereas most books of this genre often speak in generalities and hypotheticals, Guillebeau dives in with both feet, having identified, researched, and interviewed 1500 different individuals. He delves into the finances, the time spent, and whether or not the risk was worth the reward.

Spoiler alert: it was. Chris himself lives a similar lifestyle. Only in his early thirties, Guillebeau has traveled to over 170 countries and has never received a “regular” paycheck. Although a nomadic young man may not seem like the quintessential entrepreneur I would want to take advice from, I must say that while reading through his book, I found myself not just hearing what was being said, but truly listening and understanding. Certainly Chris’ own story is inspiring, but what really makes the book is when it goes onto speak of others who have achieved monetizing their passion. Take for example the Canadian snowboarder.

Tired of earning a meager income as an instructor, he decided something needed to be done to better his annual salary. After brainstorming different possible opportunities, he realized that there was a market for a DVD set of instructional videos. After creating, taping, and producing his own original films, this former snowboard instructor became the CEO of his very own 300,000$ dollar/year business. Although not exactly conventional, Chris’ bold defiance of traditional business models are intriguing, and in many cases, compelling.

He claims that “you don’t need outside investment (of any kind), an MBA, or a 65-page business plan that no one will ever read. You just need a product or service, a group of people willing to buy it, and a means of getting paid.” That being said, I am not advocating throwing the rules out of the window. I am saying his narrative is engaging, impressive and most of all, inspiring.

Getting paid to do what we love all too often seems impossible. Yet, maybe it isn’t. Maybe all we really need is a relevant, marketable idea, a little bit of confidence, and a push in the right direction. After reading The 100$ Start-Up, doing what you love doesn’t just seem possible. It seems plausible.

100$ Start-up, Chris Guillebeau

 

Finding Your Strengths

There is no question that the ability to find and be secure in your strengths is an incredibly difficult task that is becoming increasingly hard to deconstruct. Insecurity about strengths or weaknesses in the workplace is something everyone feels from their day to day lives, which the author of “Standout” examines with the release of his most recent book. Marcus Buckingham, who many people believe is a prominent presence in what is called the strengths movement, has been a leading voice in rethinking how we can uniquely succeed in the workplace through the process of specific online tests.

people at work

 

 

Different from his previous books that have focused on the first two steps of finding your strengths, his latest book titled Standout: The Groundbreaking New Strengths Assessment from the Leader of the Strengths Revolution, emphasizes the last step of the process is utilizing the online assessment to discover what your two primary strength areas are to essentially excel in the workplace.Instead of taking the approach to improve your certain weaknesses, Buckingham supports the evidence used in his book on thorough behavioral and statistical research which he used to analyze some of the world’s top business leaders. In terms of the exam itself, below are the twenty strengths that are in the assessment crafted to find areas in which you stand out and should further capitalize on in the workplace.

 

Connector

Charismatic people that have the innate ability to connect and interact with people on a high energy level very different from the average person. They value collaboration and better understanding people through interaction.

 

Provider

This role depicts someone who essentially values the community around them and does their best to support their environment in any way they can. Some forms of this include knowledge or other intellectual resources.

 

Advisor

The person who is constantly guiding others either on your team or others in the office who are willing to learn.

 

Creator

You create and are constantly coming up with new ways to approach a certain process or idea. Generating interesting ways to tackle a specific situation is something you love to do.

 

Equalizer

These types of individuals strongly feel as though everyone’s work should be at an equal level as their own. They strive to be better, while expecting the same strong work ethic in return.

 

Influencer

Based on very clear verbal directness, influencers are keen on finding ways to achieve a goal in various circumstances by capitalizing on charm or other enticing means of communication.

 

Pioneer

Intrigued by the spontaneous or exciting experiences, these individuals love to constantly challenge themselves by trying to break out of their comfort zones.

 

Stimulator

A nature leader, your high energy influences other to engage what you have to say or do at a level very different from the other strength areas.


Unlike other books that have a clear focus on improving or finding your strengths, Buckingham does not use excessive theoretical jargon or complex language to effectively achieve his message to his readers. More than anything, he holistically explains the highlights of his research so that you, the reader can find success in your respective career path full of skills that are waiting to be tapped into.

How to Win Friends and Influence People

BookThis timeless classic was first published in 1936 and to this day remains a prominent best-seller with good reason. Financial guru and fiscal extraordinaire Dale Carnegie details his tremendous success by laying out his pristine perception of people. By outwitting rivals, sympathizing with co-workers, and empathizing through shared experiences, Carnegie paints a comprehensive portrait of how to achieve the success most only dream of.

Mr. Carnegie gives timeless advice over and over again while supporting said advice with real-life examples that not only help you to wholly understand what is being said, but to remember what is being said. Anecdotal evidence has never proved so beneficial, until now. Utilizing literally the same techniques he preaches in the very prose of this book (anecdotes, empathy, support, rationale), Dale Carnegie transcends time through the written word to spread his knowledge.

To be a bit more specific (and perhaps to simplify a bit too much), the author stresses identifying with whom you are speaking by way of shared experiences. This way, you equalize the playing field, garner greater respect, and are able to, ultimately, exert influence. By putting yourself in the other’s shoes, you can plant a sort of desire that propels the individual to want what you want, and thus do what you want.

He goes on to speak at length about how to do this of course. Some mediums involve “throwing down a challenge,” letting the other recover from embarrassment and save face, and letting whoever you are talking with handle the majority of the dialogue. It’s funny; so much of the advice seems so simple and yet I’ve never quite put the notions into words. But here, with the words on the page in front of me, I feel the business lessons I have learned over the course of my career stand out with clarity.

These simplistically explained lessons provide explanations to nearly every situation, and are supported with comprehensive evidence. What’s more, after applying these lessons to my own life, I have experienced first-hand the success of these tactics when they’re employed. Mr. Carnegie has sincerely authored a truly easy-to-understand guide to success.

This straight-forward book is a well-written gift to the world and to all those lucky enough to pick it up. While it is certainly vastly popular, it took me awhile to thumb through its pages. Don’t make the same mistake as me; and expand your knowledge of business, of the world, and of life today.